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The Power of Career Visioning ‘A Guided Virtual Exercise’

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Is your career lacking direction? Do you have some ideas about potential careers however feel there may be other paths you just don’t know about? Or perhaps you know that what you are doing is not right, however you are not sure what other career paths to follow.

If you are up for spending a small amount of time reflecting and doing a you may just find some new and exciting career paths begin to form.

Before undertaking the visioning exercise below, you may like to spend a few minutes listening to the 3 minute guided visioning exercise above. Or you may just like to read and follow the instructions below. Whatever works best for you.

 


Let’s Go Through the Virtual Career Visioning Exercise

  • Find somewhere quiet where you will not be distracted for the next 10 minutes.
  • Close your eyes and take a 5 short breaths. Let go of everything else that is going on in and around you.

Picture yourself in future – this could be 5 or 10 years from now.

Focus on what you want in relation to your worklife. Think big, dream. See the success of your dream in full. Do not include practicalities around the visioning – it is dreaming only.

Move all those self-limiting thoughts to the side. Simply visualise what you want for your worklife in the future. See it in your mind. Feel it. Resist focusing on the solution about how you will achieve it. Focus only on the desired outcome of your dream. Allow the details to take care of themselves.

Visualize what it is like to experience the success of your dream. Use all of your five senses to imagine yourself x years from now or when your dream has become a reality.

Draw upon all of your senses to visualize your new worklife.

  • What do you see?
  • What do you smell?
  • What sounds do you notice?
  • What tastes are you experiencing?
  • What sensations are you experiencing?

Pay attention to how it feels to achieve your worklife dream. Have all the parts of your past come together to bring you this success. What does it feel like?

Open your eyes and come back with 5 short breaths.

Journaling: Find a quiet place and take 15 minutes to write in your journal what you saw in your vision. Describe what it felt like, sounded like and tasted like. Write down all the details as you saw them.

Audio: click below to listen to the 3 minute guided visioning exercise

Career Vision & Strategy Document: click to download the template to complete after the visioning exercise.

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Reference: http://leadershiplearning.org/system/files/VisioningTemplate_DonellaMeadows.pdf


Career Coaching Services & Programs

If you find you need some one-to-one Career Coaching support please reach out.

I offer Virtual Career Coaching and ‘The Next Step Career Career Change Program’

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There is also the ‘DIY Job Search & Career Change Program Guides’ which people find very helpful and affordable at only $9.99.

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Contact me for a free 15 minute conversation about the support your seeking

 

Get Started in 2020 With ‘The DIY Career Change Program Guides’

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“It is never too late to be what you might have been.” George Elliot

The DIY Career Change Program is a series of 5 comprehensive 40 page plus workbooks that will take you from reflecting on who you are, and what you are great at, right through to identifying new career paths and how to market yourself and your Personal Brand to secure the roles that you want to be doing.

The workbooks are full of amazing content and activities that you will find make a huge impact on how you see yourself and in helping you to move towards roles that will make you happier.

The series of 5 workbooks have been designed for you to print out as I have found people achieve better outcomes if they carry them about with them to capture thoughts, ideas, strategies, names and so on.  They will help you build the foundation and provide the road map towards your next great role.

Get ‘The DIY Career Change Program’ today

Purchase all 5 guides & receive the 39 page guide ‘Your Personal Brand – Defining, Development & Marketing Brand You!’

PersonalBrandingGuide2020

  1. Personal Awareness & Worklife Reflection
  2. Worklife Analysis & Career Exploration
  3. Research & Job Search Strategies
  4. Resume Writing, Marketing Yourself & Personal Branding
  5. Interview Preparation & Salary Negotiation

Total program cost – only AU$9.99  Click to purchase from my store on Selz.

These workbooks have helped hundreds of people to make career changes. “The workbooks have been a fantastic resource. They have been invaluable” Kerry, General Manager

 

*Not sure if your ready to do the program?  

You can get started today with my two free guides from ‘The DIY Career Change Program’ and see how you find it before you buy.  Please email me if you have any queries at kelly@kellymagowan.com

 

About the Author: Kelly Magowan has worked as a Careers & Executive Coach for 20 years. For the past 7+ years  she has worked with one of Australia’s leading business schools (MBS)  where she has developed an extensive range of online and offline careers materials and created and delivered workshops and webinars. 

2020 Professional Wide Web

How To Expand Your Job Search & Increase Your Confidence & Resilience

ING_42578_00197ladypcsmall.jpgTraditionally job searching has been something that we do solo. Which makes sense to a degree given we own and manage our careers however good career management is about having a support crew about you also – family, friends, colleagues, mentors, coaches, recruitment consultants you have built solid relationships with and trust.

Online job searching largely is a pretty deflating experience and one that is not good for our confidence. While we may initially get excited about how a job ad reads and feel that is us to a tee, having spent many hours a week online applying for jobs this sense of optimism soon fades. Even if we get a call back or interview here and there, the process leaves most people feeling low. In turn we end up losing our confidence in applying for those more exciting jobs and scale back to those that we can do with our eyes closed.  This is not all the time however in my experience personally and with clients I would suggest it is a pretty normal experience for most job seekers.

The above is why we need a support crew to help us with our job searching. We need people who see the best in us and know what we are capable off to push us into applying for those jobs that seem a bit out of our experience yet largely match up with our transferrable skills.  We need to have them encouraging us to contact recruiters and companies direct to network and to apply for those jobs we would like to but are too afraid to for fear of rejection.

Job searching takes time whether your employed at the time or not.   For professionals and executives, it is about 6-12 months to secure a new role. This is why you need a support crew to keep you going and staying positive throughout the roller coaster of emotions that is job seeking until you land your next role.

Throughout my career as a coach I have frequently sent friends, family and clients job opportunities that may appear left of field yet thought may be of interest to them to explore.  Sometimes this has been successful other times not so much.  However, while we know ourselves, we can get stuck in a set way of thinking about ourselves and the jobs we can and cannot do. We get set in our comfort zones with our careers for many reasons, such as fear of failure, lack of confidence, financial commitments, fear of networking etc.

Two of these that I want to focus on are;

  1. The investments already made in terms of money and time spent on education & training to get where we are – logic tells us it does not make sense to change (even if we are not happy)
  2. The addiction of a monthly pay cheque

Below I have fleshed out these two reasons in a bit more detail as to why we stay with the jobs we have done before in terms of our applications.  There are a multitude of different reasons why this occurs however the two I have highlighted are those that perhaps don’t receive enough consideration and are where having a support crew can help us with our job search.

  • 1) Investment in Current Career

A common reason why job seekers are reluctant to look a bit left of field is that we have created an identify for ourselves as X. We have spent money and time in educating ourselves, joining industry associations, attending functions and building (actively or passively) a personal brand as X. A such we are often reluctant to change our set path, particularly once we have achieved a management level position or above.  Regardless of how happy we are in the role we stick with what we know and doing the same or similar role. Having another person to job search with may encourage you to take a few risks with your applications and networking.

  • 2) The Addiction of the Monthly Pay Cheque

A quote from Tim Ferris that I heard on one of his podcasts was “that one of the greatest addictions people have is a monthly pay cheque”. If you ponder this thought a moment it is true.   Another reason why we stay locked in our comfort zones when job searching.  That desire to fix the addiction with another job quickly! Which is in part also due to the reality of living expenses. Having a job search support crew to check in with, challenge you a bit can also maybe help you consider other job search options that the ‘addition’ may not allow you to see.

It is good to think of having a support person or crew as someone to help open your eyes to more career possibilities – to take you out of the dark and set way of thinking about your career and skills and to show you new opportunities.

Tools to Help

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So how can you help yourself or others who are job searching and loosing motivation?

LinkedIn now offers some great info on Job Ads about Skills relevant for the roles. As your no doubt aware with the job recommendations they send you based on your profile they send you mostly things aligned with what you have done before! Not ideal however a reason for us to send on jobs to friends, family and colleagues we think may resonate with them.

I always suggest if applying online look to have an 80%+  plus match.  Knowing that hirers and recruiters are looking for a 100% match to meet their clients wish list! If networking for your job search or researching new careers you can look for a lower match 70% as growth in a role is important.

ONET & Research

A great site for looking at what jobs really involve is ONET https://www.onetonline.org/ it is a way to confirm or dispel your thoughts about particular jobs you can and cannot do as it details the skills that are most relevant for the positions, key tasks etc.   Too often people have un-justified perceptions of what jobs involve, without doing enough research. Expand your thinking and seek extra information about jobs, professions, training required etc.

Email / Phone

Don’t be afraid to ask friends, family and colleagues for help when job searching. Be it job ads they see that maybe of interest, coming around one night to help you screen job ads or send applications, motivate you to network etc.

Job searching can be such a lonely and emotional process. Consider we have support from family and friends in many other areas of our lives and that this too is an area of our lives where success and confidence come from the support of others. Identify a couple of key people to support you if your job searching or if you know someone job searching why not reach out and offer to help.

Self-Care

Wellbeing and Confidence Coach, Emma Delahey, says its important to prioritise self-care while job searching. “Being active in other areas of your life can help keep you motivated and positive during your job search. Make exercise a priority and perhaps even set yourself some small goals. It’s a good time to try a new activity, train for an event, join a sports team or commit to regular exercise with a friend. Equally important is spending time with family and friends. Regular catch ups provide fun and care. And helping a family member, friend or neighbour in need is a wonderful way to support your community and lift your spirits.

“Even though you’re focused on a big goal, to find the right job, remember to find your joy too. Continue to do things that engage you and make you smile, whether it’s cooking, writing, gardening or the playing the guitar. And try to savour job search wins, both big and small. Feel proud of your well-crafted resume, networking efforts, interview preparation and professional follow-up. Relish the positive feedback, second interview and interest in your expertise.

“If you have moments when you feel discouraged, remember the job search experience is universal. Show yourself kindness with how you talk to, encourage  and comfort yourself. Try to appreciate the great things in your life: family, friends, health, interests and sunny days. Perhaps you could write/type/draw/ a ‘hit list’, where you record personal and professional achievements over the past few years, list your top personal and professional strengths, note some challenges you’ve overcome, and jot down your favourite compliments. This exercise will enhance your confidence, give you a happy boost, and provide an uplifting resource to draw on.”

Have you helped someone with their job search before & how did it go? Would you offer to help a friend, family or colleague with their job search?

Co-Authors: 

Emma Delahey: Emma ,is a Wellbeing and confidence coach for women, you can find out more about her services on her site or contact her emmadelahey1@gmail.com    or Follow her on Instagram @emma_delahey

Kelly Magowan: Kelly is a Career & Executive Coach, Leadership Development Facilitator, and runs MBTI® Training programs for organisations through Diversitas.   She has built a reputation as a thought leader in the careers space, regularly appearing on radio and has published a book on Amazon, ‘The Busy Women’s Guide to… Salary Negotiation’. Follow her on Instagram @careerstrategist

 

Contemplating a Job/Career Change? START HERE!

If your feeling it might be time to think about your next career move, and are unsure where to start – a great place is to have a read through some of the FREE comprehensive career resources available on my site. Free Job/Career Change Resources

To find out more about Coaching Support or to book a session please make contact at Kelly Magowan or via Diversitas.

Career & Executive Coaching

 

 

Why More Women Need to Ask For More Money

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Do you avoid or struggle with negotiating your salary?

For women, more so than men, this is a common challenge. We are less inclined to back ourselves and ask for more money, even when it is rightly deserved.

The recent controversial interview with Jordan Peterson on Chanel 4 highlights some of the reasons why women still earn less than men in some occupational fields. While many things need to change in our society before we will see pay equality, one thing women can do now is to be more proactive and ambitious in salary package negotiation discussions. I certainly agree with Jordan in this area and have coached many women in conducting successful salary negotiations with new and existing employers.

See my post on ‘Salary Negotiation Tips for Executivesfor more comprehensive information on how to Ask for a Pay Rise Successfully.  In addition visit my salary negotiation website for free salary negotiation resources to help build your confidence and toolkit. 

To view the Jordan Peterson Interview on YouTube

 

Salary Negotiation Tips for Executives

“Every desire that demands satisfaction – and every need to be met – is at least potentially an occasion for people to initiate the negotiation process.” Gerard I.Nierenbergy02F09330.jpg

As an Executive, you are likely no stranger to negotiating in business or in your general daily life.

Like all children, you no doubt started off your life as a brilliant negotiator!  Yet as time went on, like so many (particularly women) your amazing negotiation super powers perhaps started to become a little rusty.  Which is why it’s so important to re-discover and apply these skills throughout your career.

We need to negotiate our salaries when and where we feel our needs are not being met on the work front.  It is our responsibility to prepare for, initiate and execute a well- planned salary package negotiation discussion.

Some avoid negotiations completely, while others go in ill prepared and leave disappointed. Others initiate the discussion, prepare effectively and conduct the negotiation with finesse – achieving a win / win outcome.

One the key ingredients that successful negotiators possess is a good understanding of humour behaviour.  They can look beyond simply satisfying their own needs, through factoring in and making assumptions about the needs (direct & indirect) of the other party with whom they are negotiating.  Considering the assumptions and needs of the other party increases your chances of a positive outcome. Particularly, understanding that when you are negotiating your salary with the decision maker, you are factoring in that they are representing two parties and two different sets of needs – their own personal needs and that of the organisation.

For more information on Salary Negotiation see my post ‘The 7 Steps to Successful Salary Negotiation’

To learn more about how to prepare effectively for your next Salary Package Negotiation, you can purchase a copy of my book on Amazon – ‘The Busy Women’s Guide to… Salary Negotiation’ . In addition  I offer one to one virtual salary negotiation coaching support.

 

Why Our Careers Are Not Ours Alone!

Our careers are not ours alone. They are the product of and the input of many. From our teachers – both formal and informal, family who support us and friends, industry associations, mentors, advocates, colleagues and so on.  To have the mindset that our careers are ours alone – a puzzle to be figured out only by ourselves may seem the case in our minds, however, it is not the reality.

If you look at any ‘successfman planeul’ people they will attribute many to their success. Think of Arnold Schwarzenegger who dislikes the label of being a self -made man. He highlights he got where he is today with the help and support of many. 

Which is why, I often don’t understand why so many are reluctant to network to help grow their expertise and networks and information sources. To engage a coach – be it life coach, career coach, executive coach, image consultant, counsellor, voice coach and so on.  Or to seek out mentors, sponsors or advocates. To have a team of people to support and encourage them through this maze of our working lives. People to help them be the best they can.

 If you reflect on your career to date, do you;

·        See it as a lone road you have travelled and will continue to travel?

·        Seek out the support of others?

·        Give support to others in their careers?

Is it time to start building your team of advocates, information sources, coaches and so on to have the worklife and success you desire, whatever it may look like.

What will ‘the workshop of yourself’ be?

3d white sofa isolatedToday I took the time to slowly  and indulgently read through an article that has been lying around the house since the weekend. I knew it was going to be a special article that I would want to take in without distraction. The article is ‘What Trent Dalton heard in GoMA’s golden chair’ published in The Weekend Australia,

This is a wonderful article that makes you reflect on who you are, your life and your purpose. Or as the writer Mr David Malouf calls it “The workshop of yourself”.  It also makes you think about those key relationships in your life.  Are they being tended? Are you giving them time?

I cannot recommend this article enough for those curious about life and keen to be inspired and to learn some wonderful lessons.

For those interested in some self – reflection work around their purpose, you can download some complimentary guides to get you started.

Salary Negotiation Essentials For Women! Get Your Free Book

Equal Pay Day in Australia is being held on the 8th September 2016.

If you are not confident, or unsure how to approach the salary negotiation conversation, you can access my e-book ‘The Busy Women’s Guide to… Salary Negotiation’ for free from the 7th – 11th September.  Normally US $4.99

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Some of the factors that contribute to wage inequality will not be easily resolved and will take time before we see real changes. However, there are a few areas women can take control of to assist in addressing the pay imbalance.  Salary package negotiation is one.

Many women are uncomfortable with salary negotiation – and avoid it. As a result, over the course of the average women’s career she is likely to forgo $700K in earnings!  Yes, that much.

It is never too late to gain the confidence and skills to engage in a successful salary package negotiation conversation and boost your earnings.  Remember everything is negotiable!

If you feel you are not being paid fairly, I encourage you to download a free copy of my e-book The Busy Women’s Guide to… Salary Negotiation 

Invest in yourself, because you are worth it. 

Note: The book is complimentary from the 7th – 11th September on Amazon, Kindle. You don’t need Kindle to download the book.


Also Don’t Miss Out On My Free Salary Negotiation Webinars in September, a chance to delve into Salary Negotiation Essentials and ask questions.

“How to Successfully Negotiate Your Salary Package. It’s Easier Than You Think! “

Career Changes & Fear – Where Is It Really Coming From?

03B65705As humans, we can be sceptical about new things as we assume it can negatively impact our lives. For most of us, change represents different degrees of ‘fear’. Fear is a double-edged sword, while it can guarantee our safety, it can also lead to us missing out on wonderful life experiences. This is certainly true when it comes to our work lives.

Throughout my work as a careers professional, for nearly all the clients I have worked with, the topic of ‘fear’ in its different guises has arisen. This fear has led to them staying in jobs and career paths that provide little satisfaction beyond the pay.

According to my experience, fear can be;

  • Fear of the unknown
  • Fear of what others will think
  • Fear of loss of status
  • Fear of loss of income
  • Fear of wasted education
  • Fear of failure
  • Fear of success
  • And the list goes on……….

Another area of ‘fear’ in the careers context is other’s ‘projecting’   their ‘fear’ onto those who looking to;

  • Take a career break
  • Change careers
  • Engage in further study
  • Start their own business
  • Create a portfolio career

It is not uncommon for people looking to make career changes, to find those around them (friends, family, colleagues) less supportive than they would have imagined about their career choices. There are certainly many reasons why others do this, however their comments are more often than not based around their own ‘fears’ which they project onto the person looking to make changes.

For example, a son who is taking a career break, may find his parents ‘acting’ supportive in some ways, while they also make unsettling comments around the length of time he has been unemployed and the impact it will have on him ever securing another ‘good’ job.   He may also find his friends and colleagues questioning his decision to take a career break for such an extended period of time and what this will do to his career.

The son, while initially feeling reasonably confident about his decision becomes increasingly uncertain. Even though he has a plan behind the career break.

In this case, the parents fear is coming from a place of parental concern about their child. From a desire to protect them.   Or, it may come from a fear of what others will say if their son has a lower status career or is unemployed for a lengthy stretch of time.

The comments from friends and colleagues could be coming from their own fears, which they are projecting. It could be their anxiety levels if they did not have secure employment or what others would think if they were not working. Or it could be genuine concern for their friends / colleagues welfare. They could also be coming from a place of jealousy, in that while they are not happy in their career, they don’t have the money or confidence to take a career break and potentially make a career transition.

It is normal to have fears around making major changes in our work lives. What we don’t expect when we decide to make changes, is how much the comments of others who doubt and question us, make us question our decisions.

On the topic of career breaks, they are very common these days for all manner of reasons – travel, study, family and a desire to simply take an extended break to recharge.  Which makes sense given how hard and long most people work.

When making any changes in your work life be sure to spend some time reflecting and understanding your own fears. Also, be mindful to monitor the comments of those around you – friends, family and colleagues. Don’t take on board their ‘fears’, instead focus on strategies to overcome yours.