Salary Negotiation Tips for Executives


“Every desire that demands satisfaction – and every need to be met – is at least potentially an occasion for people to initiate the negotiation process.” Gerard I.Nierenbergy02F09330.jpg

As an Executive, you are likely no stranger to negotiating in business or in your general daily life.

Like all children, you no doubt started off your life as a brilliant negotiator!  Yet as time went on, like so many (particularly women) your amazing negotiation super powers perhaps started to become a little rusty.  Which is why it’s so important to re-discover and apply these skills throughout your career.

We need to negotiate our salaries when and where we feel our needs are not being met on the work front.  It is our responsibility to prepare for, initiate and execute a well- planned salary package negotiation discussion.

Some avoid negotiations completely, while others go in ill prepared and leave disappointed. Others initiate the discussion, prepare effectively and conduct the negotiation with finesse – achieving a win / win outcome.

One the key ingredients that successful negotiators possess is a good understanding of humour behaviour.  They can look beyond simply satisfying their own needs, through factoring in and making assumptions about the needs (direct & indirect) of the other party with whom they are negotiating.  Considering the assumptions and needs of the other party increases your chances of a positive outcome. Particularly, understanding that when you are negotiating your salary with the decision maker, you are factoring in that they are representing two parties and two different sets of needs – their own personal needs and that of the organisation.

For more information on Salary Negotiation see my post ‘The 7 Steps to Successful Salary Negotiation’

To learn more about how to prepare effectively for your next Salary Package Negotiation, you can purchase a copy of my book on Amazon – ‘The Busy Women’s Guide to… Salary Negotiation’ . In addition  I offer one to one virtual salary negotiation coaching support.

 




Why Our Careers Are Not Ours Alone!


Our careers are not ours alone. They are the product of and the input of many. From our teachers – both formal and informal, family who support us and friends, industry associations, mentors, advocates, colleagues and so on.  To have the mindset that our careers are ours alone – a puzzle to be figured out only by ourselves may seem the case in our minds, however, it is not the reality.

If you look at any ‘successfman planeul’ people they will attribute many to their success. Think of Arnold Schwarzenegger who dislikes the label of being a self -made man. He highlights he got where he is today with the help and support of many. 

Which is why, I often don’t understand why so many are reluctant to network to help grow their expertise and networks and information sources. To engage a coach – be it life coach, career coach, executive coach, image consultant, counsellor, voice coach and so on.  Or to seek out mentors, sponsors or advocates. To have a team of people to support and encourage them through this maze of our working lives. People to help them be the best they can.

 If you reflect on your career to date, do you;

·        See it as a lone road you have travelled and will continue to travel?

·        Seek out the support of others?

·        Give support to others in their careers?

Is it time to start building your team of advocates, information sources, coaches and so on to have the worklife and success you desire, whatever it may look like.




What will ‘the workshop of yourself’ be?


3d white sofa isolatedToday I took the time to slowly  and indulgently read through an article that has been lying around the house since the weekend. I knew it was going to be a special article that I would want to take in without distraction. The article is ‘What Trent Dalton heard in GoMA’s golden chair’ published in The Weekend Australia,

This is a wonderful article that makes you reflect on who you are, your life and your purpose. Or as the writer Mr David Malouf calls it “The workshop of yourself”.  It also makes you think about those key relationships in your life.  Are they being tended? Are you giving them time?

I cannot recommend this article enough for those curious about life and keen to be inspired and to learn some wonderful lessons.

For those interested in some self – reflection work around their purpose, you can download some complimentary guides to get you started.




Salary Negotiation Essentials For Women! Get Your Free Book


Equal Pay Day in Australia is being held on the 8th September 2016.

If you are not confident, or unsure how to approach the salary negotiation conversation, you can access my e-book ‘The Busy Women’s Guide to… Salary Negotiation’ for free from the 7th – 11th September.  Normally US $4.99

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Some of the factors that contribute to wage inequality will not be easily resolved and will take time before we see real changes. However, there are a few areas women can take control of to assist in addressing the pay imbalance.  Salary package negotiation is one.

Many women are uncomfortable with salary negotiation – and avoid it. As a result, over the course of the average women’s career she is likely to forgo $700K in earnings!  Yes, that much.

It is never too late to gain the confidence and skills to engage in a successful salary package negotiation conversation and boost your earnings.  Remember everything is negotiable!

If you feel you are not being paid fairly, I encourage you to download a free copy of my e-book The Busy Women’s Guide to… Salary Negotiation 

Invest in yourself, because you are worth it. 

Note: The book is complimentary from the 7th – 11th September on Amazon, Kindle. You don’t need Kindle to download the book.


Also Don’t Miss Out On My Free Salary Negotiation Webinars in September, a chance to delve into Salary Negotiation Essentials and ask questions.

“How to Successfully Negotiate Your Salary Package. It’s Easier Than You Think! “




Career Changes & Fear – Where Is It Really Coming From?


03B65705As humans, we can be sceptical about new things as we assume it can negatively impact our lives. For most of us, change represents different degrees of ‘fear’. Fear is a double-edged sword, while it can guarantee our safety, it can also lead to us missing out on wonderful life experiences. This is certainly true when it comes to our work lives.

Throughout my work as a careers professional, for nearly all the clients I have worked with, the topic of ‘fear’ in its different guises has arisen. This fear has led to them staying in jobs and career paths that provide little satisfaction beyond the pay.

According to my experience, fear can be;

  • Fear of the unknown
  • Fear of what others will think
  • Fear of loss of status
  • Fear of loss of income
  • Fear of wasted education
  • Fear of failure
  • Fear of success
  • And the list goes on……….

Another area of ‘fear’ in the careers context is other’s ‘projecting’   their ‘fear’ onto those who looking to;

  • Take a career break
  • Change careers
  • Engage in further study
  • Start their own business
  • Create a portfolio career

It is not uncommon for people looking to make career changes, to find those around them (friends, family, colleagues) less supportive than they would have imagined about their career choices. There are certainly many reasons why others do this, however their comments are more often than not based around their own ‘fears’ which they project onto the person looking to make changes.

For example, a son who is taking a career break, may find his parents ‘acting’ supportive in some ways, while they also make unsettling comments around the length of time he has been unemployed and the impact it will have on him ever securing another ‘good’ job.   He may also find his friends and colleagues questioning his decision to take a career break for such an extended period of time and what this will do to his career.

The son, while initially feeling reasonably confident about his decision becomes increasingly uncertain. Even though he has a plan behind the career break.

In this case, the parents fear is coming from a place of parental concern about their child. From a desire to protect them.   Or, it may come from a fear of what others will say if their son has a lower status career or is unemployed for a lengthy stretch of time.

The comments from friends and colleagues could be coming from their own fears, which they are projecting. It could be their anxiety levels if they did not have secure employment or what others would think if they were not working. Or it could be genuine concern for their friends / colleagues welfare. They could also be coming from a place of jealousy, in that while they are not happy in their career, they don’t have the money or confidence to take a career break and potentially make a career transition.

It is normal to have fears around making major changes in our work lives. What we don’t expect when we decide to make changes, is how much the comments of others who doubt and question us, make us question our decisions.

On the topic of career breaks, they are very common these days for all manner of reasons – travel, study, family and a desire to simply take an extended break to recharge.  Which makes sense given how hard and long most people work.

When making any changes in your work life be sure to spend some time reflecting and understanding your own fears. Also, be mindful to monitor the comments of those around you – friends, family and colleagues. Don’t take on board their ‘fears’, instead focus on strategies to overcome yours.




Brene Brown – Careers, Life, Parenting, Guilt, Shame, Wholehearted & more…


“For women, we have a lot of different shame triggers but the number one with women is appearance and body image. For men the number one shame trigger is professional identity and status.Brene Brown

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If you have not come across the researcher Brene Brown before, I would encourage you to check her out. She has some amazing videos on YouTube around vulnerability and more recently I found this fantastic interview with her on Dumbo Feather, ‘Brene Brown Is a Grounded Researcher. The interview covers all manner of topics and provides some insightful and thought provoking questions and ideas.  It is very relevant for those who are going through or contemplating a career transition.

While not covered in this interview, Brene Brown has a great visual tactic she uses around vulnerability. She encourages people to keep an empty glass jar and add a marble to it each time you show vulnerability.  I use this same concept around my career & lifestyle – putting in marbles when I am working on my career and doing things in my life that are positive (I empty it each month and start again). Often we neglect working on our career and making time for doing things that provide us with personal satisfaction and enjoyment such as hobbies, exercise, meditation, friends, travel etc. It is just too easy to be busy doing all the things we believe we ‘should’ be doing and neglecting doing more of the things we actually want to be doing.  I find the marble exercise simple, yet very effective for bringing more balance and enjoyment into my life. That said I do have better months than others. It is a work in progress!




‘How to Negotiate Your Next Salary Increase’ Breakfast Event 22nd April 2016


02C75578I am delighted to be presenting a Salary Negotiation Workshop for Women in Banking & Finance (WIBF). All are welcome to come along for breakfast on 22nd April and to learn some effective salary negotiation techniques.

It should be a fun, and hopefully personally and financially rewarding breakfast.

Visit the WIBF site to learn more and register. I hope to see you there.

If you cannot attend, you can purchase my book, The Busy Women’s Guide to Salary Negotiation on Amazon.

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Best jobs for your personality type


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How to Start to Find Meaning / Purpose in Your Worklife


There is not one big cosmic meaning for all; there is only the meaning we each give to our life, an individual meaning, an individual plot, like an individual novel, a book for each person.”  Anais Nin

I am yet to meet someone who is not looking to have a work & life that provides them with a sense of meaning / purpose.  It is important to remember that meaning / purpose looks different to each and every one of us. It is very much a personal thing. The question then is for those yet to find or define this – how to set about doing so?

A lot of the work around meaning / purpose can be tied to our values. In the careers work I do with clients, the foundations are about identifying what the core values are and building upon these. See the below diagram to get you thinking about your purpose.

You can also access some great talks on TED about meaning and purpose in our work and life. Additionally a great article with links to some terrific values exercises is Finding True North – How to Clarify Values 

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The Right Way To Ask For A Raise


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As we come to the end of the year, many of us think about our goals for the new year.  An increase in income is often a big one for a lot of us.  I am thrilled to share that my friend Susie Moore is offering some awesome free video training on “The Right Way To Ask For A Raise”.  Susie coaches a lot of people on confidence and how to ask for what you want and when it comes to money it’s so important to speak up!  There is evidence that those who consistently negotiate a raise earn $1M more over the course of our career.

Here is her first free video on why you have to ask for a raise if you are confident that you deserve one. Click here: susiemoore.ontraport.com/t?orid=2028&opid=1

Over the next few days you will see a couple of more free videos with even more key insights – covering what not asking is really costing you and what 3 key things that need to be in place before you ask for more money at work.

Be on the lookout for a special free bonus gift that I have created in support of this important subject. All of those who sign up for the series will receive a complimentary copy of my book, The Busy Women’s Guide to… Salary Negotiation.